Category Archives: Uncategorized

Monday Night=Game Night

I don’t remember how this Monday night game night started, but it’s fun! My boyfriend, his friend and his wife, and I get together at my boyfriend’s place to play a board game. I’m the one who gets to choose the game and for a while it was Marvel Champions, but we’ve switched it up by playing Wingspan and (lately) Mansions of Madness. If we can’t get together, we’ll jump on Steam & Discord and play Pandemic or Horrified.

Some of the heroes you can play Marvel Champions. Not shown is my favorite, Captain America 🙂
Credit: www.dicebreaker.com

The night starts at 7 P.M., and the friend and his wife bring their dinner over and the four of us eat. We play a game until 11 P.M., sometimes 12 A.M., depending on what it is. Since my boyfriend and his friend work from home and the ladies don’t work at all, ending late isn’t a problem.

In a time when social interactions are more important, it’s nice to do this every week. Note: my boyfriend has gotten his first COVID shot (getting the second today), and his friend and wife have been extra careful to not get sick. They mostly stay home. Same goes with me.

If you haven’t tried any of the games mentioned above, do so!! I especially like Marvel and Mansions of Madness. The latter being that there’s a companion app that features a story, which I like.

What are you favorite board games? Let me know in the comments!!

Why I Stressed About Valentine’s Day

Remember when I mentioned that my boyfriend deserved to be pampered on Valentine’s Day because of what he did on Saturday?

Well, here’s the story behind that…

On Saturday, January 30th, I had a uterine polyp removed. It was the first surgery I’ve had as an adult, and I was happy that I could have one person stay with me prior to the procedure. A few days before I told my boyfriend that I wasn’t going to sleep over Friday because I had to be at the hospital at 6:30 A.M. Saturday.

He said that he’d take me…and wait with me!!

He waited with me until my surgery time, 8:30 A.M.

He even let me take one of his Eeyore plushies to keep me company during surgery (which, unfortunately, had to be left outside of the OR so he wouldn’t be accidentally thrown out when my bed sheets were collected and taken to laundry). If Eeyore had gone missing my boyfriend wouldn’t been sad.

Even though I was nervous, having him (my boyfriend, and to an extent, Eeyore) with me made me feel a little better. It would’ve been terrible having to wait in the surgery center alone.

But that’s why I was fretting about Valentine’s Day (which went well!!) He’s just a nice guy.

And in case you were wondering, the polyp was benign. However, I’m still having some pelvic pain three weeks later…going to get that checked next week.

Valentine’s, Men, and Gifts

I’m not the type to get hyped up about Valentine’s Day. Having spent majority of my life single, February 14 always made me feel sad and, if I’m being honest, a little irritated. Sad, because seeing girls in high school carrying roses and/or balloons around campus made me realize how single I was; and irritated because I didn’t understand why there needed to be a DAY dedicated to showing your love.

I knew that Valentine’s Day wasn’t only about romantic love (my dad always gave me a box of chocolates and a card), but boy, it sure felt like it. Whenever the Valentine’s Day commercials started, I groaned and switched stations. I avoided social media because I didn’t want to see everyone’s posts to their SO’s and make me feel even MORE alone.

Even when my first Valentine’s Day with my ex was approaching, I wasn’t too excited about it because it was ingrained in me that the day of love was just another day. I didn’t even buy him anything…

However, this year is different.

I’m actually stressing a little over what to get my new boyfriend, who, after this past Saturday (I’ll type up a post about that later this week), deserves to be pampered. Or, at least be given a gift.

BUT WHAT DO I GET HIM???

I went to Target today and browsed their Valentine’s Day aisles. I thought he’d like candy, so I bought him the limited edition Lindt’s LINDOR Strawberries and Cream truffles (he can’t eat chocolate, and he loves strawberries).

But that’s not enough…

What else do guys want on Valentine’s Day?? As gifts?? Do guys even WANT to be given chocolate??

Help!

Exercise Routine

Everyday Health

Since the coronavirus pandemic last March (!!) I’ve been exercising more. And since I had to stay home (and am still at home), I had no excuse not to turn on YouTube and get moving. I feel healthier after I finish a session and mentally my mind is calmer.

So, what is my routine? Here it is.

Monday
-Cardio

Tuesday
-Strength training
-Cardio (a walk outside)

Wednesday
-Cardio

Thursday
-Strength training
-Cardio (a walk outside)

Friday
-Cardio

Saturday and Sunday
-Rest

It took me a while to get a good routine going, but there you have it. It works for me now, but I’ll need to modify this when I begin working.

And in case you were wondering what YouTube channels I use…

Bowflex, which is great for short, targeted exercise like three-minute standing abs workout.
POPSUGAR Fitness, for 30 minute cardio and strength routines.
Walk at Home, for easy cardio, by just walking and other exercises thrown in.
Yoga with Adriene, this is reserved for night time.

(In addition to my routine above, I’m doing the 30-Day Squat Challenge from Shape Magazine because, I want to. I’m on Day 18!)

Have you been exercising during the pandemic? I’d like to hear what your routine is!

Introduce Yourself (Example Post)

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus your own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.

Introduce Yourself (Example Post)

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus your own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.

Introduce Yourself (Example Post)

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus your own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.

Health

How’s 2021 treating you so far?

I had a long few days, starting with Monday night when I began experiencing a (sinus) headache PLUS a dehydration headache.

I thought that I’d be fine the next morning, and I was right, at least for the latter. My sinuses were still acting up and I was getting worried that it was COVID (I’m a worrywart). Oddly, my boyfriend had the same symptoms starting Monday night and went to get tested the next day. Thankfully, his test was negative.

I, however, waited until yesterday to see if my stuffiness and sinuses would get better, but no. I was having post nasal drip that resulted in coughing. So, just to be safe I called my doctors office and asked if they knew where I could get tested. I didn’t want to wait 2-3 days for my results, so I went down to the mobile testing lab which said results would be processed within 3-6 hours.

It was the longest six hours of my life.

I finished the test at 2:30pm, and when 5:30pm came and no email notification about my results, I gave the lab two more hours since it was still early.

No email at 8:30pm.

At that point, I was a little concerned. But, I went to bed and slept well (huh?)

This morning, I received that email…and went to log in to the system to check my results…and it was negative. (Looking at the timestamp, the lab finished processing my test close to 2:00am!!!)

Negative.

Thank goodness.

handdrawn-phew-e1454267307519-1024x573-1

Photo via beingtheoutlier.com

I wasted five hours (maybe more) worrying. Not good.

But, it’s during times like that that it really helps to have coping mechanisms ready so you don’t waste away your days wondering, “what if” thoughts. I’m still making these tips a habit, but hopefully you’ll find them useful too the next time you’re waiting for test results, COVID or not.

Distraction: Queue up Netflix and watch a feel good show. Or get off the computer and watch TV. Read. Text someone. Get outside. Since it was night and I was still waiting for the results, I took a shower. There was no way I could repeatedly check my email that way.

Vent: Sometime last night, I texted my boyfriend, saying how hard it was to wait for the results. I briefly mentioned my concern to my dad. I felt better after those interactions and found that I could focus a little easier on something other than my results after letting it out. Getting all of the worrisome thoughts out of your head and onto paper, or telling someone about how you’re feeling will ease your mind.

Re-frame negative thoughts: This is one that I feel lifts my spirits up instantly. Instead of thinking, “What if my test is positive?” re-frame the question as, “What if my test is NOT positive?” Try it. Don’t you feel better already?

Continue to stay safe!! We can get through this!!